1. Incoming students attending the orientation program partake in a dance class outside of Ulrich’s Books on July 14, 2014.

    Photo: Joseph Xu, Michigan Engineering Communications & Marketing

    www.engin.umich.edu

     

  2. Rawan Awad reacts to almost flipping their kayak as she and Dan Masserant go through the man-made cascades on Huron River near  Argo Pond in downtown Ann Arbor on a sunny July afternoon.  Thursday, July 24th, 2014.  

    Photo by Marcin Szczepansk/Senior Multimedia Producer, University of Michigan, College of Engineering

    www.engin.umich.edu

     

  3. Participants of the “It’s All About The Music Camp” had the opportunity to record their own music in the United Sound recording studio on July 16, 2014. 

    Photo: Joseph Xu, Michigan Engineering Communications & Marketing

    www.engin.umich.edu

     

  4. MABEL, once dubbed the world’s fasted running bipedal robot, has served her tenure as the primary research robot of U-M engineering professor Jessy Grizzle, and now sits in the biomechanics exhibit at the Chicago Field Museum.

    Prof. Grizzle, a Elmer G. Gilbert Distinguished University Professor and Jerry W. and Carol L. Levin Professor of Engineering with appointments in the EECS and Mechanical Engineering departments at U-M, developed MABEL in coordination with  Jonathan Hurst of the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon.  Grizzle is now working (again with Hurst) on MARLO, his next generation bipedal robot.

    For more information on MABEL and MARLO:

    http://web.eecs.umich.edu/~grizzle/papers/robotics.html

    Produced by Marcin Szczepanski and Evan Dougherty / Michigan Engineering Multimedia Producers

     

  5. Would you use your urine to save the planet? 

    Abe Noe-Hays applies pasteurized urine to a test bed of lettuce. Abe Noe-Hays is a co-founder of Rich Earth Institute. The institute promotes collecting and using human urine as a plant fertilizer to reduce global water pollution and provide affordable fertilizer to farmers.  The institute works with the University of Michigan engineering researchers to test the public health safety of urine fertilizer.     Photo by Marcin Szczepanski/Senior Multimedia Producer, University of Michigan, College of Engineering  

    More on the project:

    http://www.engin.umich.edu/college/about/news/stories/2014/august/pee-to-plant-food-a-visit-to-the-urine-depot

     

  6. Do you want to use your urine to save the planet? 

    Hay farm near Brattleboro, Vermont where Rich Earth institute tests human urine as a fertilizer on hay and lettuce. Abe Noe-Hays and Kim Nace are the co-founders of the Rich Earth Institute. They promote collection and use of human urine as a plant fertilizer to reduce global water pollution and to provide affordable fertilizer to farmers.  The institute works with the University of Michigan engineering researchers to test the public health safety of urine fertilizer.    Photo by Marcin Szczepanski/Senior Multimedia Producer, University of Michigan, College of Engineering  

     

  7. Abe Noe-Hays and Kim Nace are co-founders of the Rich Earth Institute in Brattleboro, VT. They promote collecting and using human urine as a plant fertilizer as a way to reduce global water pollution and close the food nutrient cycle.  The institute works with the University of Michigan engineering researchers to test the public health safety of urine fertilizer.    Photo by Marcin Szczepanski/Senior Multimedia Producer, University of Michigan, College of Engineering  

    More on the project: 

    http://www.engin.umich.edu/college/about/news/stories/2014/august/pee-to-plant-food-a-visit-to-the-urine-depot

      

      

     

  8. An Xplore Engineering Camp participant plays with the oobleck during the Can You Walk on or Bounce a Fluid? worksop in the Dow Building on June 27, 2014.

    Participants learn about viscosity, shear, and the flow and explore the unique properties of everyday fluids.

    Photo: Joseph Xu, Michigan Engineering Communications & Marketing

    www.engin.umich.edu

     

  9. Michigan Engineering’s hard look at fracking, titled “Fracktopia,” earned it a Michigan Emmy Award in the Science & Nature category. Learn about the practice of hydraulic fracturing in this short documentary, which explores the techniques and potential risks to the environment and health.

    View the full DME here: http://dme.engin.umich.edu/fracking/

    Produced by Marcin Szczepanski / Senior Multimedia Producer and Nicole Casal Moore / Public Relations Representative Lead and Writer

     

  10. Rowing: It’s Good For Your Brain

    The Michigan Men’s Rowing Team, a club varsity sport at U-M, is an athletic team that attracts many engineering students. Close to 95% of the students on the team never rowed before college, and around 50% of the total team is made up of engineers. While it might seem out of place for engineering students to be so highly represented on the team, they see it as a perfect fit.

    For more information on the team:
    http://michiganrowing.org/

    Video: Evan Dougherty, Michigan Engineering Multimedia Content Producer

     

  11. Terry Shyu, MSE PhD Student, demonstrates use of nanopillars that reveal hidden images via condensation of fluid on the structures in the NCRB on June 20, 2014.

    Shyu is party of Nick Kotov’s research group that is using this form of nanostructure for the purpose of authenticating documents, currency, and so forth.

    Photo: Joseph Xu, Michigan Engineering Communications & Marketing

    www.engin.umich.edu

     

  12. Over a single weekend, teams from over 23 countries participated in the Global Space Balloon Challenge by launching and recovering high-altitude balloons.

    Michigan’s team, MBuRST, led the creation of this competition in coordination with teams at Stanford and MIT. The challenge was designed as an international education outreach project to encourage global cooperation and generate interest in the field of high-altitude balloon research.

    Produced by Evan Dougherty and Ben Logan

    www.engin.umich.edu

     

  13. First-Year Engineering Students worked together in teams to design, build, and test remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) that can close valves and collect data underwater. Students learned and utilized principles in topics such as 3D modeling, buoyancy, and teamwork in constructing and operating their vehicles. 

    The class culminated with a competition pitting ROVs against each other at Canham Natatorium at the end of the semester.

    Produced by Marcin Szczepanski and Joseph Xu / 
    Michigan Engineering Multimedia Producers

    www.engin.umich.edu

     

  14. Jaesang Lee, Electrical Engineering PhD Student and member of the Stephen Forrest’s Optoelectronic Components and Materials Laboratory, tests a light concentrating LED in the EECS Building on May 29, 2014.

    The LED is able to both generate and emit light through its pyramidal shape, enabling for efficient energy use. 

    Photo: Joseph Xu, Michigan Engineering Communications & Marketing

    www.engin.umich.edu

     

  15. Volker Sick, Arthur F Thurnau Professor of Mechanical Engineering, analyzes one of the engine systems from his research group’s engine cycle tests in the Walter E. Lay Auto Laboratory on May 22, 2014.

    Sick’s group researches engine systems and is a Collaborative Research Laboratory (CRL) that works under a collaborative research agreement with General Motors (GM). The agreement was recently extended, focusing on the two primary areas of research of engine systems and advanced manufacturing.

    Photo: Joseph Xu, Michigan Engineering Communications & Marketing

    www.engin.umich.edu